IHS Research Seminar Series

As part of the IHS Research Seminar Series, two of our PhD Students will be sharing the session on 11 July 2018.

Emma Radclyffe’s presentation is entitled ‘Examining Borderline Personality Disorder Diagnosis in Bipolar Disorder’ and Kim Caldwell’s is entitled ‘An exploration of illness perceptions in people with bipolar disorder: using the Self-Regulation Model to develop a grounded theory’.

The seminar will take place 1.00pm-2.00pm in BYG197.

Download the flyer for more details.

Battle of Worcester Society – Hearing women’s voices in the English Civil Wars

Hearing Women’s Voices during the English Civil Wars

  • The Society is delighted to welcome Anne Laurence, Emeritus Professor of the Open University, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, School of History, who will be presenting our third Civil War Talk this season, Hearing Women’s Voices during the English Civil Wars – what wartime meant to everyday life.

Anne started her career as a historian working on parliamentary army chaplains, at the time debate raged about the nature of English civil war radicalism. After that she worked on women, publishing a general text book on women in England 1500-1760. She continued to work on women and latterly worked on women investors in the stock-market of the early eighteenth century, but she digressed into Irish history, the history of grief and of women’s psychological disorders, all inspired by fortunate archival discoveries. She retired as professor of history at the Open University two years ago and is now co-ordinating a community history project on the 37 First World War casualties commemorated in the church of the Oxford parish in which she lives.

Anne

Day and Date:                         Thursday 12 July, 2018

Time    :                                   Doors open 6.30 p.m.   Talk begins 7.00 p.m.

Place:                                      The Studio, The Hive, Sawmill Walk, The Butts, Worcester, WR1 3PD (note change of venue)

Tickets:                                    Students £3, BOWS members £5, Guests £7 – can be purchased at the door on the night, or in advance from the Gift Shop at the Commandery, the Information Tourist Centre in the High Street or from the Society on 01905 358640

The Hive Café is open throughout the evening

Parking:                                   There is a large car park at The Hive, charges are 40p for half an hour and from 7.00 p.m. it is £1 only, no further payment needed

Anne has many published works, a list of them can be seen on the Open University website:  http://www.open.ac.uk/research/people/al22

We look forward to seeing you there!

Best wishes,

Christine Shaw
Events Secretary
BOWS

 

IHS Research Seminar 13 June – Do Altruists Attract? The Role of Pro-social Behaviours in Mate Choice – Dr Daniel Farrelly

As part of the IHS Research Seminar Series, Dr Daniel Farrelly (Senior Lecturer – Psychology) will be presenting a session entitled ‘Do Altruists Attract? The Role of Pro-social Behaviours in Mate Choice’ on 13 June 2018.

The seminar will take place 1.00pm-2.00pm in EEG020.

Please see the attached flyer for further information.

Share and Inspire – Improving Direct Entry and Foundation Degree/HND Student Transitions to Honours Degrees

Thursday 7 June 12:15-14:00 (lunch available from 1200)

Room: SJC, Conference Centre, CC004 (Worcester Room)

Description: This Share and Inspire session will outline the key findings from a University retention and success project aimed at improving the transition experiences of Direct Entry, Foundation Degree and HND students who progress to Top-Up/Honours Degrees.

Sector research (e.g. French, Kempson and Kendal, 2015; Thomas, 2002; Thomas, 2012; Yorke and Longden, 2008) identifies a number of key transition points in the undergraduate student journey and that experiences prior to and at these points can have consequences for student satisfaction, progression, retention and achievement. Findings from this project suggest differences in students’ experience of transition to Top-Up/direct entry to L5/L6 of Honours Degrees at course/discipline level and that this represents a particular point of transition that may have some similar as well as distinct student needs in comparison to the ‘typical’ Honours Degree student. In particular, their transition can involve changes in culture, purpose, and connectedness and this may challenge their resourcefulness and capabilities to succeed.

This session will identify the key challenges and factors that may impede successful transition, provide the opportunity for you to share your own experiences and best practice in managing effective transitions and will showcase some initiatives from Institutes which aim to improve the student’s transition experience and promote student success.

It is particularly relevant to course leaders and anyone else seeking to further develop their approaches to support transition for students on HNDs, Foundation Degrees or ‘Top-Up’ Degrees or those who have direct entry students joining undergraduate courses at Level 5 or Level 6 of the Honours Degree.

Please book onto the workshop via the staff development portal under ‘your online services’ and select ‘academic development’ from the dropdown menu.

IHS Research Seminar 13 June – Do Altruists Attract? The Role of Pro-social Behaviours in Mate Choice – Dr Daniel Farrelly

As part of the IHS Research Seminar Series, Dr Daniel Farrelly (Senior Lecturer – Psychology) will be presenting a session entitled ‘Do Altruists Attract? The Role of Pro-social Behaviours in Mate Choice’ on 13 June 2018.

The seminar will take place 1.00pm-2.00pm in EEG020.

Please see the attached flyer for further information.

Share and Inspire – Improving Direct Entry and Foundation Degree/HND Student Transitions to Honours Degrees

Thursday 7 June 12:15-14:00 (lunch available from 1200)

Room: SJC, Conference Centre, CC004 (Worcester Room)

Description: This Share and Inspire session will outline the key findings from a University retention and success project aimed at improving the transition experiences of Direct Entry, Foundation Degree and HND students who progress to Top-Up/Honours Degrees.

Sector research (e.g. French, Kempson and Kendal, 2015; Thomas, 2002; Thomas, 2012; Yorke and Longden, 2008) identifies a number of key transition points in the undergraduate student journey and that experiences prior to and at these points can have consequences for student satisfaction, progression, retention and achievement. Findings from this project suggest differences in students’ experience of transition to Top-Up/direct entry to L5/L6 of Honours Degrees at course/discipline level and that this represents a particular point of transition that may have some similar as well as distinct student needs in comparison to the ‘typical’ Honours Degree student. In particular, their transition can involve changes in culture, purpose, and connectedness and this may challenge their resourcefulness and capabilities to succeed.

This session will identify the key challenges and factors that may impede successful transition, provide the opportunity for you to share your own experiences and best practice in managing effective transitions and will showcase some initiatives from Institutes which aim to improve the student’s transition experience and promote student success.

It is particularly relevant to course leaders and anyone else seeking to further develop their approaches to support transition for students on HNDs, Foundation Degrees or ‘Top-Up’ Degrees or those who have direct entry students joining undergraduate courses at Level 5 or Level 6 of the Honours Degree.

Please book onto the workshop via the staff development portal under ‘your online services’ and select ‘academic development’ from the dropdown menu.

IHS Research Seminar Series – 23 May – Darier Disease and Neuropsychiatric Illness

As part of the IHS Research Seminar Series, Dr Katherine Gordon-Smith (Mood Disorders Research Group) will be presenting a session entitled ‘Darier Disease and Neuropsychiatric Illness’ on 23 May 2018.

The seminar will take place 1.00pm-2.00pm in EEG020.

Please see the attached flyer for further information.

Share and Inspire – Improving Direct Entry and Foundation Degree/HND Student Transitions to Honours Degrees

Thursday 7 June 12:15-14:00 (lunch available from 1200)

Room: SJC, Conference Centre, CC004 (Worcester Room)

Description: This Share and Inspire session will outline the key findings from a University retention and success project aimed at improving the transition experiences of Direct Entry, Foundation Degree and HND students who progress to Top-Up/Honours Degrees.

Sector research (e.g. French, Kempson and Kendal, 2015; Thomas, 2002; Thomas, 2012; Yorke and Longden, 2008) identifies a number of key transition points in the undergraduate student journey and that experiences prior to and at these points can have consequences for student satisfaction, progression, retention and achievement. Findings from this project suggest differences in students’ experience of transition to Top-Up/direct entry to L5/L6 of Honours Degrees at course/discipline level and that this represents a particular point of transition that may have some similar as well as distinct student needs in comparison to the ‘typical’ Honours Degree student. In particular, their transition can involve changes in culture, purpose, and connectedness and this may challenge their resourcefulness and capabilities to succeed.

This session will identify the key challenges and factors that may impede successful transition, provide the opportunity for you to share your own experiences and best practice in managing effective transitions and will showcase some initiatives from Institutes which aim to improve the student’s transition experience and promote student success.

It is particularly relevant to course leaders and anyone else seeking to further develop their approaches to support transition for students on HNDs, Foundation Degrees or ‘Top-Up’ Degrees or those who have direct entry students joining undergraduate courses at Level 5 or Level 6 of the Honours Degree.

Please book onto the workshop via the staff development portal under ‘your online services’ and select ‘academic development’ from the dropdown menu.

Share and Inspire – Improving Direct Entry and Foundation Degree/HND Student Transitions to Honours Degrees

Thursday 7 June 12:15-14:00 (lunch available from 1200)

Room: SJC, Conference Centre, CC004 (Worcester Room)

Description: This Share and Inspire session will outline the key findings from a University retention and success project aimed at improving the transition experiences of Direct Entry, Foundation Degree and HND students who progress to Top-Up/Honours Degrees.

Sector research (e.g. French, Kempson and Kendal, 2015; Thomas, 2002; Thomas, 2012; Yorke and Longden, 2008) identifies a number of key transition points in the undergraduate student journey and that experiences prior to and at these points can have consequences for student satisfaction, progression, retention and achievement. Findings from this project suggest differences in students’ experience of transition to Top-Up/direct entry to L5/L6 of Honours Degrees at course/discipline level and that this represents a particular point of transition that may have some similar as well as distinct student needs in comparison to the ‘typical’ Honours Degree student. In particular, their transition can involve changes in culture, purpose, and connectedness and this may challenge their resourcefulness and capabilities to succeed.

This session will identify the key challenges and factors that may impede successful transition, provide the opportunity for you to share your own experiences and best practice in managing effective transitions and will showcase some initiatives from Institutes which aim to improve the student’s transition experience and promote student success.

It is particularly relevant to course leaders and anyone else seeking to further develop their approaches to support transition for students on HNDs, Foundation Degrees or ‘Top-Up’ Degrees or those who have direct entry students joining undergraduate courses at Level 5 or Level 6 of the Honours Degree.

Please book onto the workshop via the staff development portal under ‘your online services’ and select ‘academic development’ from the dropdown menu.

Athena SWAN Bronze Award

The University of Worcester has successfully achieved the prestigious Athena SWAN Bronze Award.

athena award 1

The awards, made by the Equality Challenge Unit (ECU), recognise commitment to tackling gender inequality in higher education and research.

The Universities application and associated action plan was developed by a Self-Assessment Team chaired by Dr John-Paul Wilson, Deputy Pro Vice Chancellor Research, who is also senior lead for Athena SWAN with Professor Maggie Andrews as Academic Lead for Athena SWAN.

About Athena SWAN

‌ECU’s Athena SWAN Charter was originally established in 2005 to encourage and recognise commitment to advancing the careers of women in science, technology, engineering, maths and medicine (STEMM) employment in higher education and research.

In May 2015 the Athena SWAN Charter was expanded to recognise work undertaken in arts, humanities, social sciences, business and law (AHSSBL), and in professional and support roles, and for trans staff and students. The charter now recognises work undertaken to address gender equality more broadly, and not just barriers to progression that affect women.

The Athena SWAN Charter covers women (and men where appropriate) in:

  • academic roles in STEMM and AHSSBL
  • professional and support staff
  • trans staff and students

In relation to their:

  • representation
  • progression of students into academia
  • journey through career milestones
  • working environment for all staff

Athena SWAN at Worcester

The University is a member of Athena SWAN and is fully committed to the principles of the Charter. We set out our commitment in our application for an Athena SWAN Bronze Award in November 2017, you can read the full application below.

For more information on Athena SWAN at Worcester please email AthenaSWAN@worc.ac.uk.

Global Perspectives in Teacher Education International Conference

Tuesday 19 June – Wednesday 20 June

This exciting joint (with the University of Worcester and British Educational Research Association) conference entitled ‘Global Perspectives in Teacher Education’ will focus on a number of important themes related to the impact of globalisation and internationalisation on sustainable teacher education. The conference will consider ideas such as inclusion, sharing knowledge across the globe, curriculum and its impact on knowledge generation, globalising teacher education, developing evidence-informed practice and self-improving systems, diversity, global citizenship, and intercultural education. This conference takes forward some of the issues explored during last year’s conference entitled ‘Bridging the Global Educational Gap’, where we continued to look at UNESCO Education 2030: A Framework for Action and Education in a Global Context. This year’s conference will consider concrete solutions which support the UNESCO Education 2030 goals with the aim of allowing partnerships, networks and collaborations to be developed that will take forward some purposeful and real projects to support the development and vision of high-quality sustainable teacher education across the world.

The conference is aimed at researchers, academics, consultants, practitioners, teachers, research students and professionals working in fields such as international, inter-cultural and comparative education, curriculum development, education policy and practice. It will be a wonderful opportunity to make connections with others in your field and to support strong research-informed practice.

For further details please see the website at: https://www.worcester.ac.uk/discover/global-perspectives-in-teacher-education.html

 

ISES Research Seminars

Staff and students are invited to attend Institute of Sport & Exercise Science Research Seminars being held on 14 May:

Appetite and eating behaviour responses to acute high-intensity intermittent exercise in overweight, inactive females

Monday 14 May from 13:15-13:45 in EE 2033, St John’s Campus

Alice Burgin
PhD Research Student

Appetite and energy intake may be suppressed following high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE). Considering the potential for inducing a negative energy balance, this warrants further research in an inactive, overweight population. Yet, many previous studies have explored eating behaviour responses (appetite, energy and macronutrient intake) at pre-determined time points post-exercise which restricts the generalisability of these findings to the real world. In addition, the requirement of specialised apparatus of many HIIE protocols (such as exercise bikes) questions the effectiveness of many HIIE protocols for public health interventions. The purpose of the study that will be presented was to investigate participant-determined eating behaviours in response to a previously studied protocol of 4x30seconds of apparatus-free HIIE (star jumps) in inactive, overweight females. Findings may have important implications for the regulation of energy balance and weight management for this population.


Legacy, Education and Impact: a reflective piece on practice based research

Monday 14 May from 13:45-14:15 in EE 2033, St John’s Campus

Verity Postlethwaite
Final year doctoral candidate

The following presentation will be based on doctoral research conducted since October 2015 around the title – A legacy and policy evaluation in the case of education and the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics – the presentation will discuss a series of reflections around conducting research between academia and industry. The terms legacy and education will be considered from the perspectives of: academia, policy makers, media, sceptics and delivery agents; with a particular focus on how the differing angles have created a nexus of discourse and perception to the role of legacy within sporting mega event educational programmes. Secondly, the term impact will be considered from the perspective of a doctoral student who has proactively engaged with a non-academic audience throughout the research project, moreover, cultivated practical implications throughout the research.

Reflections of this nature are routinely undertaken and disseminated by academics and practitioners alike, this presentation will contribute to such; plus, suggest that there needs to be further problematisation and interrogation of particular challenges and tensions. The context for the presentation will be the nexus created by the terms – legacy, education and impact. Through the context and reflections the costs, benefits, opportunities and threats of working between academia and industry will be highlighted. In particular, how the expectations around impact from the beneficiaries, researchers and institutions must be articulated from the outset of practice based research, especially, in the realms of doctoral practice based research. The reflections will allow the author to articulate thoughts that will be useful to prospective doctoral students and then academic and non-academic audiences engaging with practice based research.

Participants needed for Psychology staff project: Personality and Emotional Processing

I am running a study looking at the link between personality and emotional processing (a 45 min online survey, plus a 10 min computer based task to be completed on campus) & need research participants. This is a great way to experience the research process and, if you take part in the study, you’ll have the option of receiving feedback after completing the computer based task. If you’re interested and would like to know more, please click here (https://limefppw.ugent.be/limesurvey205/index.php/156193/lang-en) or email me, Dr Sarah Davis, Psychology: sarah.davis@worc.ac.uk. Thank you in advance!

Share and Inspire – Improving Direct Entry and Foundation Degree/HND Student Transitions to Honours Degrees

Thursday 7 June 12:15-14:00 (lunch available from 1200)

Room: SJC, Conference Centre, CC004 (Worcester Room)

Description: This Share and Inspire session will outline the key findings from a University retention and success project aimed at improving the transition experiences of Direct Entry, Foundation Degree and HND students who progress to Top-Up/Honours Degrees.

Sector research (e.g. French, Kempson and Kendal, 2015; Thomas, 2002; Thomas, 2012; Yorke and Longden, 2008) identifies a number of key transition points in the undergraduate student journey and that experiences prior to and at these points can have consequences for student satisfaction, progression, retention and achievement. Findings from this project suggest differences in students’ experience of transition to Top-Up/direct entry to L5/L6 of Honours Degrees at course/discipline level and that this represents a particular point of transition that may have some similar as well as distinct student needs in comparison to the ‘typical’ Honours Degree student. In particular, their transition can involve changes in culture, purpose, and connectedness and this may challenge their resourcefulness and capabilities to succeed.

This session will identify the key challenges and factors that may impede successful transition, provide the opportunity for you to share your own experiences and best practice in managing effective transitions and will showcase some initiatives from Institutes which aim to improve the student’s transition experience and promote student success.

It is particularly relevant to course leaders and anyone else seeking to further develop their approaches to support transition for students on HNDs, Foundation Degrees or ‘Top-Up’ Degrees or those who have direct entry students joining undergraduate courses at Level 5 or Level 6 of the Honours Degree.

Please book onto the workshop via the staff development portal under ‘your online services’ and select ‘academic development’ from the dropdown menu.

ISES Research Seminar – A comparison of different precooling interventions on self-paced intermittent exercise in the heat

Staff and students are invited to attend an Institute of Sport & Exercise Science Research Seminar being held on 4 May:

A comparison of different precooling interventions on self-paced intermittent exercise in the heat

Friday 4 May from 13:45-14:45 in EE 1057, St John’s Campus
Gavin Thomas
Teaching Fellow in Sport & Exercise Science

Exposure to high ambient temperatures and humidity during sporting events pose additional physiological stress on the human body. This load increases the risk of heat-related illness and is known to drastically impair endurance performance, due to the bodies reduced capacity to dissipate heat. In an attempt to attenuate thermal strain and prevent the associated decrements in self-paced intermittent exercise performance, a number of different precooling strategies have been investigated. For example, ingestion of ice slurry and wearing cooling garments prior to exercise. This presentation will discuss the results from two studies, which sought to examine the effectiveness of different precooling strategies prior to self-paced intermittent exercise in the heat.

 

Share and Inspire – Improving Direct Entry and Foundation Degree/HND Student Transitions to Honours Degrees

Thursday 7 June 12:15-14:00 (lunch available from 1200)

Room: SJC, Conference Centre, CC004 (Worcester Room)

Description: This Share and Inspire session will outline the key findings from a University retention and success project aimed at improving the transition experiences of Direct Entry, Foundation Degree and HND students who progress to Top-Up/Honours Degrees.

Sector research (e.g. French, Kempson and Kendal, 2015; Thomas, 2002; Thomas, 2012; Yorke and Longden, 2008) identifies a number of key transition points in the undergraduate student journey and that experiences prior to and at these points can have consequences for student satisfaction, progression, retention and achievement. Findings from this project suggest differences in students’ experience of transition to Top-Up/direct entry to L5/L6 of Honours Degrees at course/discipline level and that this represents a particular point of transition that may have some similar as well as distinct student needs in comparison to the ‘typical’ Honours Degree student. In particular, their transition can involve changes in culture, purpose, and connectedness and this may challenge their resourcefulness and capabilities to succeed.

This session will identify the key challenges and factors that may impede successful transition, provide the opportunity for you to share your own experiences and best practice in managing effective transitions and will showcase some initiatives from Institutes which aim to improve the student’s transition experience and promote student success.

It is particularly relevant to course leaders and anyone else seeking to further develop their approaches to support transition for students on HNDs, Foundation Degrees or ‘Top-Up’ Degrees or those who have direct entry students joining undergraduate courses at Level 5 or Level 6 of the Honours Degree.

Please book onto the workshop via the staff development portal under ‘your online services’ and select ‘academic development’ from the dropdown menu.

ISES Research Seminar – A comparison of different precooling interventions on self-paced intermittent exercise in the heat

Staff and students are invited to attend an Institute of Sport & Exercise Science Research Seminar being held on 4 May:

A comparison of different precooling interventions on self-paced intermittent exercise in the heat

Friday 4 May from 13:45-14:45 in EE 1057, St John’s Campus
Gavin Thomas
Teaching Fellow in Sport & Exercise Science

Exposure to high ambient temperatures and humidity during sporting events pose additional physiological stress on the human body. This load increases the risk of heat-related illness and is known to drastically impair endurance performance, due to the bodies reduced capacity to dissipate heat. In an attempt to attenuate thermal strain and prevent the associated decrements in self-paced intermittent exercise performance, a number of different precooling strategies have been investigated. For example, ingestion of ice slurry and wearing cooling garments prior to exercise. This presentation will discuss the results from two studies, which sought to examine the effectiveness of different precooling strategies prior to self-paced intermittent exercise in the heat.

 

‘Shame and Mental Health’ Panel debate

INVITATION TO PANEL DEBATE

What is the impact of shame on mental health and wellbeing?

SAVE THE DATE!

Thursday 17 May
The Lecture Theatre, Riverside Campus, University of Worcester 6pm-8pm

You are cordially invited to a panel debate for Mental Health Awareness Week 2018, which shines a spotlight on stress.

Research has shown that 16 million people experience a mental health problem each year and stress is a key factor in this. Research has also shown that there are strong links between stress, mental health and shame. Professor Brene Brown PhD, defines shame as:

The intensely painful feeling or experience of believing that we are flawed and therefore unworthy of love and belonging – something we’ve experienced, done, or failed to do makes us unworthy of connection.

During our event, an eminent panel of experts will illustrate and debate the following questions:

  1. What causes people to feel shame?
  2. How do men and women experience shame, (how does it affect how we think, feel, behave, perform and perceive ourselves, others and the world)?
  3. What can we do differently in Worcestershire to lessen any impact of shame on the mental health and wellbeing of all sections of our society?
  4. What would that mean for our public services, our workplaces, our schools, housing and community?

We also consider the audience as ‘experts’ and will value your input on the form of discussion/debate and invite you to put forward questions for the panel.

 Booking details and confirmation of panel members to follow.

time to changemental health awareness weekcommunity firstWorcester community foundation

 

Share and Inspire – Improving Direct Entry and Foundation Degree/HND Student Transitions to Honours Degrees

Thursday 7 June 12:15-14:00 (lunch available from 1200)

Room: SJC, Conference Centre, CC004 (Worcester Room)

Description: This Share and Inspire session will outline the key findings from a University retention and success project aimed at improving the transition experiences of Direct Entry, Foundation Degree and HND students who progress to Top-Up/Honours Degrees.

Sector research (e.g. French, Kempson and Kendal, 2015; Thomas, 2002; Thomas, 2012; Yorke and Longden, 2008) identifies a number of key transition points in the undergraduate student journey and that experiences prior to and at these points can have consequences for student satisfaction, progression, retention and achievement. Findings from this project suggest differences in students’ experience of transition to Top-Up/direct entry to L5/L6 of Honours Degrees at course/discipline level and that this represents a particular point of transition that may have some similar as well as distinct student needs in comparison to the ‘typical’ Honours Degree student. In particular, their transition can involve changes in culture, purpose, and connectedness and this may challenge their resourcefulness and capabilities to succeed.

This session will identify the key challenges and factors that may impede successful transition, provide the opportunity for you to share your own experiences and best practice in managing effective transitions and will showcase some initiatives from Institutes which aim to improve the student’s transition experience and promote student success.

It is particularly relevant to course leaders and anyone else seeking to further develop their approaches to support transition for students on HNDs, Foundation Degrees or ‘Top-Up’ Degrees or those who have direct entry students joining undergraduate courses at Level 5 or Level 6 of the Honours Degree.

Please book onto the workshop via the staff development portal under ‘your online services’ and select ‘academic development’ from the dropdown menu.

Share and Inspire – Improving Direct Entry and Foundation Degree/HND Student Transitions to Honours Degrees

Thursday 7 June 12:15-14:00 (lunch available from 1200)

Room: SJC, Conference Centre, CC004 (Worcester Room)

Description: This Share and Inspire session will outline the key findings from a University retention and success project aimed at improving the transition experiences of Direct Entry, Foundation Degree and HND students who progress to Top-Up/Honours Degrees.

Sector research (e.g. French, Kempson and Kendal, 2015; Thomas, 2002; Thomas, 2012; Yorke and Longden, 2008) identifies a number of key transition points in the undergraduate student journey and that experiences prior to and at these points can have consequences for student satisfaction, progression, retention and achievement. Findings from this project suggest differences in students’ experience of transition to Top-Up/direct entry to L5/L6 of Honours Degrees at course/discipline level and that this represents a particular point of transition that may have some similar as well as distinct student needs in comparison to the ‘typical’ Honours Degree student. In particular, their transition can involve changes in culture, purpose, and connectedness and this may challenge their resourcefulness and capabilities to succeed.

This session will identify the key challenges and factors that may impede successful transition, provide the opportunity for you to share your own experiences and best practice in managing effective transitions and will showcase some initiatives from Institutes which aim to improve the student’s transition experience and promote student success.

It is particularly relevant to course leaders and anyone else seeking to further develop their approaches to support transition for students on HNDs, Foundation Degrees or ‘Top-Up’ Degrees or those who have direct entry students joining undergraduate courses at Level 5 or Level 6 of the Honours Degree.

Please book onto the workshop via the staff development portal under ‘your online services’ and select ‘academic development’ from the dropdown menu.

Share and Inspire – Improving Direct Entry and Foundation Degree/HND Student Transitions to Honours Degrees

Thursday 7 June 12:15-14:00 (lunch available from 1200)

Room: SJC, Conference Centre, CC004 (Worcester Room)

Description: This Share and Inspire session will outline the key findings from a University retention and success project aimed at improving the transition experiences of Direct Entry, Foundation Degree and HND students who progress to Top-Up/Honours Degrees.

Sector research (e.g. French, Kempson and Kendal, 2015; Thomas, 2002; Thomas, 2012; Yorke and Longden, 2008) identifies a number of key transition points in the undergraduate student journey and that experiences prior to and at these points can have consequences for student satisfaction, progression, retention and achievement. Findings from this project suggest differences in students’ experience of transition to Top-Up/direct entry to L5/L6 of Honours Degrees at course/discipline level and that this represents a particular point of transition that may have some similar as well as distinct student needs in comparison to the ‘typical’ Honours Degree student. In particular, their transition can involve changes in culture, purpose, and connectedness and this may challenge their resourcefulness and capabilities to succeed.

This session will identify the key challenges and factors that may impede successful transition, provide the opportunity for you to share your own experiences and best practice in managing effective transitions and will showcase some initiatives from Institutes which aim to improve the student’s transition experience and promote student success.

It is particularly relevant to course leaders and anyone else seeking to further develop their approaches to support transition for students on HNDs, Foundation Degrees or ‘Top-Up’ Degrees or those who have direct entry students joining undergraduate courses at Level 5 or Level 6 of the Honours Degree.

Please book onto the workshop via the staff development portal under ‘your online services’ and select ‘academic development’ from the dropdown menu.

Objectivity does not require the elimination of subjectivity – IHS Seminar

6 July 2018 (12.00 – 13.30)

St John’s Campus, University of Worcester

Speaker: John Paley

John Paley, who was formerly a senior lecturer at the University of Stirling, is now busily retired. John writes on topics related to philosophy and health care, including research methods, evidence, complexity, spirituality, the post-Francis debate about compassion, and nursing ethics. He is author of Phenomenology as Qualitative Research: A Critical Analysis of Meaning Attribution (2017 – Routledge).

Anyone who has ever read a book on qualitative methods will have come across criticisms of objectivism, positivism, post-positivism, and reductionism, all of which are allegedly sins of quantitative methods and other scientific approaches (including evidence-based medicine). One especially popular view relates to ‘objectivism’. It involves the claim that all researchers have certain characteristics which make objectivity impossible. That is: because they are human beings, researchers cannot help but have opinions, emotions, values, biases, predispositions and feelings. They make assumptions, including political and cultural assumptions; they are dogmatic and ideological. Quantitative researchers, like everybody else, are replete with a human subjectivity from which they cannot escape and which they cannot just decide to cancel. So eliminating subjectivity, or dislodging it, or detaching oneself from it, is impossible. Which means that objectivity is impossible, too. This paper, in contrast, suggests that the ‘objectivity is impossible’ argument is based on a false premise. Objectivity does not require that we free ourselves of interpretation, judgment, values and prejudice. It does not require the elimination of subjectivity. What it does require is not only humanly possible but humanly necessary.

This seminar is free of charge

To book a place please contact: Joanne Fleet: e-mail: j.fleet@worc.ac.uk tel: 01905 85 5147

IHS Research Seminar Presentation – 11 April

Understanding perinatal mental health care and referral decisions among midwives and health visitors
Joanne Johnson
PhD Student – Institute of Health & Society

Exploring the relationships between physical activity, sedentary behaviour and mood, in people with bipolar disorder.
Gemma McCullough
PhD Student – Institute of Health & Society

Please see attached for further details.

Voices of Women in the Great War & its Aftermath on 13/14 April 

Voices of Women in the Great War & its Aftermath on 13/14 April Conference.

On the Friday night there is also a 1918 Centenary Jamboree.

Details of all below and also on the Eventbrite site for booking – https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/voices-of-women-in-the-great-war-its-aftermath-and-the-1918-centenary-jamboree-tickets-39003909744

Although the Great War is often seen as a time of change, offering new opportunities for women and culminating in 1918 in the extension of the franchise to many, the conflict was not experienced in the same way by all. Class, region, age and marital status all shaped women’s lives during the war and after.

Working opportunities on the land, in munitions, clerical work, transport services and the armed forces gave young women in particular a chance to experience a modicum of freedom.

The majority of women were housewives in wartime, supporting and worrying about their loved ones in the armed forces and undertaking voluntary work. The war created new problems as women struggled to feed their families, care for children and make ends meet; struggles which often continued in the inter-war years.

This conference seeks to explore the multiplicity of women’s voices during the war and in the years that followed. It will look at the mundane and the extraordinary, the domestic and working worlds, the political and private, in order critically to examine elements of continuity and change and to consider what was to become the legacy of the Great War for women.

We are delighted to announce that our KEYNOTE speakers will include ELIZABETH CRAWFORD, independent researcher; DR DEBORAH THOM of Robinson College, Cambridge; and Dr SIAN ROBERTS of the University of Birmingham.

On the Friday evening, you and your families are invited to join us for our 1918 Centenary Jamboree!

During this social evening, the museum will be open to all for a family friendly evening exploring what life was like in the West Midlands in 1918, the last year of First World War, as women were enfranchised and peace came to the area at last. Visitors can view films, exhibitions and re-enactors, enter our quizzes or the Suffrage Bake-off, taste the Black Country Museum’s famous fish and chips and listen to live music from Merrie Noise and the Trench Choir.

This event has been supported by Voices of War and Peace AHRC World War One Engagement CentreHistory West Midlands and University Of Worcester.

2018-04-13 BCLM Voices Conf final poster sml web

Jamboree flier_sml

Voices of Women in the Great War & its Aftermath on 13/14 April 

Voices of Women in the Great War & its Aftermath on 13/14 April Conference.

On the Friday night there is also a 1918 Centenary Jamboree.

Details of all below and also on the Eventbrite site for booking – https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/voices-of-women-in-the-great-war-its-aftermath-and-the-1918-centenary-jamboree-tickets-39003909744

Although the Great War is often seen as a time of change, offering new opportunities for women and culminating in 1918 in the extension of the franchise to many, the conflict was not experienced in the same way by all. Class, region, age and marital status all shaped women’s lives during the war and after.

Working opportunities on the land, in munitions, clerical work, transport services and the armed forces gave young women in particular a chance to experience a modicum of freedom.

The majority of women were housewives in wartime, supporting and worrying about their loved ones in the armed forces and undertaking voluntary work. The war created new problems as women struggled to feed their families, care for children and make ends meet; struggles which often continued in the inter-war years.

This conference seeks to explore the multiplicity of women’s voices during the war and in the years that followed. It will look at the mundane and the extraordinary, the domestic and working worlds, the political and private, in order critically to examine elements of continuity and change and to consider what was to become the legacy of the Great War for women.

We are delighted to announce that our KEYNOTE speakers will include ELIZABETH CRAWFORD, independent researcher; DR DEBORAH THOM of Robinson College, Cambridge; and Dr SIAN ROBERTS of the University of Birmingham.

On the Friday evening, you and your families are invited to join us for our 1918 Centenary Jamboree!

During this social evening, the museum will be open to all for a family friendly evening exploring what life was like in the West Midlands in 1918, the last year of First World War, as women were enfranchised and peace came to the area at last. Visitors can view films, exhibitions and re-enactors, enter our quizzes or the Suffrage Bake-off, taste the Black Country Museum’s famous fish and chips and listen to live music from Merrie Noise and the Trench Choir.

This event has been supported by Voices of War and Peace AHRC World War One Engagement CentreHistory West Midlands and University Of Worcester.

2018-04-13 BCLM Voices Conf final poster sml web

Jamboree flier_sml

ISES Research Seminar – Working with para athletes – factors for consideration

Staff and students are invited to attend an Institute of Sport & Exercise Science Research Seminar being held on 10 April 2018:

Working with para athletes – factors for consideration

Tuesday 10 April 2018 from 13:00-14:00 in EE 1026, St John’s Campus

Dr Andrea Faull

Head of Department for PE, Sports Coaching & Dance
Principal Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology

Working with para athletes (often referred to as athletes with a disability; AWD) frequently draws parallels with working with athletes without a disability, but there are specific issues that sport psychology practitioners and researchers need to consider in order to further develop our understanding and approach to practice with this particular population.

Research in the area of para sport psychology has significantly increased over the past 10 years, but there are still limited psychometric measures available to effectively and specifically assess baseline levels of basic psychological skills. This session will discuss the key issues to consider when working with this population as well as present current research on the recent development of the Wheelchair Imagery Ability Questionnaire (WIAQ; Faull & Jones, 2017).

 

IHS Research Seminar – Understanding Perinatal Mental Health Care/Exploring the Relationships Between Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Mood, in People with Bipolar Disorder

As part of the IHS Research Seminar Series, two of our PhD Students will be sharing the session on 11 April 2018. Joanne Johnson’s presentation is entitled ‘Understanding Perinatal Mental Health Care and Referral Decisions Among Midwives and Health Visitors’ and Gemma McCullough’s is entitled ‘Exploring the Relationships Between Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Mood, in People with Bipolar Disorder’.

The seminar will take place 1.00pm-2.00pm in PNG009.

Wildlife Photographer David Plummer Speaking in Worcester

The Green Voices Research Group, supported by the Institute of Humanities, and with colleagues in photography, have invited the wildlife photographer David Plummer to speak at The Hive on Wednesday 18 April. The talk will include a Q+A and will address questions around wildlife photography and David’s practice in the face of his having Parkinson’s Disease. Full details on the attached.

Everybody welcome, but please book beforehand at http://www.thehiveworcester.org/events.html.

Wildlife Photographer David Plummer Speaking in Worcester

The Green Voices Research Group, supported by the Institute of Humanities, and with colleagues in photography, have invited the wildlife photographer David Plummer to speak at The Hive on Wednesday 18th April. The talk will include a Q+A and will address questions around wildlife photography and David’s practice in the face of his having Parkinson’s Disease. Full details on the attached.

Everybody welcome, but please book beforehand at http://www.thehiveworcester.org/events.html.

IHS Research Seminar – 28 March 2018 Student Suicide: Prevention and Postvention in UK HEIS:

As part of the IHS Research Seminar Series, Chantal Vinyard and Hilary Causer (PhD Students) will be presenting a session entitled ‘Student Suicide: Prevention and Postvention in UK HEIS’ on Wednesday, 28 March 2018.

The seminar will take place 1.00pm-2.00pm in EEG020.

Please see the attached flyer for further information.

Voices of Women in the Great War & its Aftermath on 13/14 April 

Voices of Women in the Great War & its Aftermath on 13/14 April Conference.

On the Friday night there is also a 1918 Centenary Jamboree.

Details of all below and also on the Eventbrite site for booking – https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/voices-of-women-in-the-great-war-its-aftermath-and-the-1918-centenary-jamboree-tickets-39003909744

Although the Great War is often seen as a time of change, offering new opportunities for women and culminating in 1918 in the extension of the franchise to many, the conflict was not experienced in the same way by all. Class, region, age and marital status all shaped women’s lives during the war and after.

Working opportunities on the land, in munitions, clerical work, transport services and the armed forces gave young women in particular a chance to experience a modicum of freedom.

The majority of women were housewives in wartime, supporting and worrying about their loved ones in the armed forces and undertaking voluntary work. The war created new problems as women struggled to feed their families, care for children and make ends meet; struggles which often continued in the inter-war years.

This conference seeks to explore the multiplicity of women’s voices during the war and in the years that followed. It will look at the mundane and the extraordinary, the domestic and working worlds, the political and private, in order critically to examine elements of continuity and change and to consider what was to become the legacy of the Great War for women.

We are delighted to announce that our KEYNOTE speakers will include ELIZABETH CRAWFORD, independent researcher; DR DEBORAH THOM of Robinson College, Cambridge; and Dr SIAN ROBERTS of the University of Birmingham.

On the Friday evening, you and your families are invited to join us for our 1918 Centenary Jamboree!

During this social evening, the museum will be open to all for a family friendly evening exploring what life was like in the West Midlands in 1918, the last year of First World War, as women were enfranchised and peace came to the area at last. Visitors can view films, exhibitions and re-enactors, enter our quizzes or the Suffrage Bake-off, taste the Black Country Museum’s famous fish and chips and listen to live music from Merrie Noise and the Trench Choir.

This event has been supported by Voices of War and Peace AHRC World War One Engagement CentreHistory West Midlands and University Of Worcester.

2018-04-13 BCLM Voices Conf final poster sml web

Jamboree flier_sml

Voices of Women in the Great War & its Aftermath on 13/14 April 

Voices of Women in the Great War & its Aftermath on 13/14 April Conference.

On the Friday night there is also a 1918 Centenary Jamboree.

Details of all below and also on the Eventbrite site for booking – https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/voices-of-women-in-the-great-war-its-aftermath-and-the-1918-centenary-jamboree-tickets-39003909744

Although the Great War is often seen as a time of change, offering new opportunities for women and culminating in 1918 in the extension of the franchise to many, the conflict was not experienced in the same way by all. Class, region, age and marital status all shaped women’s lives during the war and after.

Working opportunities on the land, in munitions, clerical work, transport services and the armed forces gave young women in particular a chance to experience a modicum of freedom.

The majority of women were housewives in wartime, supporting and worrying about their loved ones in the armed forces and undertaking voluntary work. The war created new problems as women struggled to feed their families, care for children and make ends meet; struggles which often continued in the inter-war years.

This conference seeks to explore the multiplicity of women’s voices during the war and in the years that followed. It will look at the mundane and the extraordinary, the domestic and working worlds, the political and private, in order critically to examine elements of continuity and change and to consider what was to become the legacy of the Great War for women.

We are delighted to announce that our KEYNOTE speakers will include ELIZABETH CRAWFORD, independent researcher; DR DEBORAH THOM of Robinson College, Cambridge; and Dr SIAN ROBERTS of the University of Birmingham.

On the Friday evening, you and your families are invited to join us for our 1918 Centenary Jamboree!

During this social evening, the museum will be open to all for a family friendly evening exploring what life was like in the West Midlands in 1918, the last year of First World War, as women were enfranchised and peace came to the area at last. Visitors can view films, exhibitions and re-enactors, enter our quizzes or the Suffrage Bake-off, taste the Black Country Museum’s famous fish and chips and listen to live music from Merrie Noise and the Trench Choir.

This event has been supported by Voices of War and Peace AHRC World War One Engagement CentreHistory West Midlands and University Of Worcester.

2018-04-13 BCLM Voices Conf final poster sml web

Jamboree flier_sml

IOA/IOH Research Seminar

Please see attached details of the IOA/OH Research Seminar on Tuesday 20 March 2018 at 5.15pm in CC007 (Malvern Room) which will be another double bill:

David Arnold will be presenting:
“Writing and Spiritual Practice – a Buddhist Perspective

Stephanie Jones will be presenting:
“’Simply as an Instrument’: The Female Characters of Christine Brooke-Rose”

Date/Time: Tuesday 20 March 2018 @ 5.15pm

Location: St John’s Campus, Conference Centre CC 007 (Malvern Room)

Everyone welcome!